ABS Releases World’s First Scrubber Ready Guide

By MarEx 2015-10-12 21:05:57

ABS, a leading provider of classification and technical services to the global marine and offshore industry, has published the ABS Guide for SOx Scrubber Ready Vessels to support members and clients in preparing newbuilds for future outfitting with a SOx exhaust gas cleaning system (EGCS).

Supporting the world’s first classification notation for SOx Scrubber Ready Vessels, the ABS Guide formalizes the process for clients who wish to plan for retrofit of a SOx scrubber at a future date by providing a detailed review and approval and an associated notation.

The SOx Scrubber Ready notation is in addition to ABS EGCS notations that may be assigned for vessels fitted with an exhaust emission abatement system, including SOx scrubbers, selective catalytic reduction systems and exhaust gas recirculation arrangements for NOx emission control, in accordance with the ABS Guide for Exhaust Emission Abatement.

“The decision to build a new ship or retrofit an existing one is not simple due to uncertainty with the entry into force of the 0.5 percent global sulfur limit and cleaner fuel alternatives such as LNG,” says ABS Chief Technology Officer and Senior Vice President Howard Fireman. “The new ABS SOx Scrubber Ready notation provides a unique approach to future-proof assets, to implement cost-effective retrofits and to demonstrate a commitment to environmental performance.”

In addition to the new ABS Guide for SOx Scrubber Ready Vessels and Guide for Exhaust Emission Abatement, ABS has published the ABS Advisory on Exhaust Gas Scrubber Systems.

The guide is available here.

Ship tracks in the Atlantic

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240 Years of Navy Celebrated in Images

By Wendy Laursen 2015-10-12 20:24:17

On October 13, 1775, the Continental Congress approved legislation for two vessels to be equipped and armed with 10 carriage guns as well as crews of 80 sailors charged with intercepting transport ships carrying munitions and stores to the British army in America.

That marked the birth of the U.S. Navy, 240 years ago.

September 23, 2014

RED SEA (September 23, 2014) The guided-missile destroyer USS Arleigh Burke (DDG-51) launches Tomahawk cruise missiles to conduct strikes against ISIL targets. Arleigh Burke is deployed in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Carlos M. Vazquez II/Released)

May 1, 2011

Osama bin Laden, Most Wanted Terrorists (www.fbi.gov/Released)

January 12, 2010

BONEL, Haiti (January 19, 2010) A Haitian boy watches as rigid-hull inflatable boats from the amphibious dock landing ships USS Fort McHenry (LSD-43) and USS Carter Hall (LSD-50) arrive ashore at the New Hope Mission at Bonel, Haiti. The multi-purpose amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD-5) is on station in Haiti with the amphibious dock landing ships USS Fort McHenry, USS Gunston Hall (LSD-44), and USS Carter Hall supporting Operation Unified Response, a joint humanitarian assistance mission to Haiti following a 7.0 magnitude on January 12. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kristopher Wilson/Released)

February 20, 2008

PACIFIC OCEAN (Feb 20, 2008) A modified tactical Standard Missile-3 launches from the U.S. Navy AEGIS cruiser USS Lake Erie (CG-70), successfully impacting a non-functioning National Reconnaissance Office satellite approximately 247 kilometers (133 nautical miles) over the Pacific Ocean, as it traveled in space at more than 17,000 mph. President George W. Bush decided to bring down the satellite because of the likelihood that the satellite could release hydrazine fuel upon impact, possibly in populated areas. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

October 7, 2001

At sea aboard USS Enterprise (October 18, 2001)—U.S. Navy sailors inspect AGM-65 Maverick air-to-surface tactical missiles on the flight deck of USS Enterprise (CVN-65) in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate Airman Apprentice Lance H. Mayhew Jr./Released)

January 16, 1991

Two F/A-18C Hornet aircraft of Strike Fighter Squadron 74 fly above the Forrestal-class aircraft carrier USS Saratoga (CV-60) making a hard turn to starboard during Desert Shield. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

April 18, 1988

The Iranian frigate IS Sahand (F 74) burns after being attacked by the Joseph Strauss (DDG-16) and A-6s. Sahand was hit by three Harpoon missiles, Skipper rocket-propelled bombs, a Walleye laser-guided bomb, and several 1,000-pound bombs. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

December 17, 1970

Adm. Elmo R. Zumwalt Jr., Chief of Naval Operations (seated, third from left), speaks with the Human Relations Council at Fleet Activities, Yokosuka, Japan, July 2, 1971. (U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate Second Class Edward C. Mucma/Released)

July 29, 1967

Crewmen aboard USS Forrestal (CVA-59) battle flames amid smoke and charred debris on the after flight deck where a violent chain reaction of fires and explosions were set off by an initial blast as attack aircraft were being prepared for launch on combat missions over North Vietnam while the ship was deployed in the Gulf of Tonkin, July 29, 1967 (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

March 11, 1965

River Boat 117 under Attack at Night. Acrylic by John Steel. (U.S. Navy Art Collection/Released)

October 22, 1962

A U.S. Navy P-3A Orion of Patrol Squadron VP-44 flies over the Soviet ship Metallurg Anosov and destroyer USS Barry (DD-933) during the Cuban Missile Crisis, November 10, 1962. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

December 30, 1959

Rear Adm. William F. Rayborn (left) and Adm. Arleigh A. Burke, Chief of Naval Operations, examine a cutaway model of the ballistic missile submarine USS George Washington (SSBN-598), in July 1959. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

September 30, 1954

USS Nautilus. Watercolor painting on paper by Albert K. Murray. (U.S. Navy Art Collection/Released)

September 15, 1950

Inchon Landing. Colored pencil on paper by Herbert C. Hahn, 1951. (U.S. Navy Art Collection/Released)

October 23–26, 1944

Leyte Gulf IJN Yamashira in Surigao Strait. Oil on wood by John Hamilton. (U.S. Navy Art Collection/Released)

June 6, 1944

The Battle for Fox Green Beach. Oil painting by Dwight C. Shepler. (U.S. Navy Art Collection/Released)

June 4–7, 1942

The Battle of Midway. Oil painting by Robert Benney, 1943. (U.S. Navy Art Collection/Released)

April 18, 1942

The Tokyo Raid by U.S. Army B-25 Bombers. Oil painting by John Charles Roach. (U.S. Navy Art Collection/Released)

December 7, 1941

USS California (BB-44) slowly sinking alongside Ford Island as a result of bomb and torpedo damage, December 7, 1941. USS Shaw (DD-373) is burning in the floating dry dock YFD-2 in the left distance. USS Nevada (BB-36) is beached in the left-center distance. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

March 20, 1922

USS Langley (CV-1) at anchor off Christobal, Panama Canal Zone, March 1, 1930. She has 24 aircraft on her flight deck. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

March 1917

Chief Yeoman (F), USNRF during World War I. Painting by Anne Fuller Abbott, 1925. (U.S. Navy Art Collection/Released)

December 16, 1907

Great White Fleet in Magellan Strait. Painting by Orlando S. Lagman. (U.S. Navy Art Collection/Released)

May 1, 1898

Battle of Manila Bay. Painting by Frederick Bauer, 1910. (U.S. Navy Art Collection/Released)

March 8, 1862

The Ironclads. Painting by Raymond Bayless. (U.S. Navy Art Collection/Released)

October 29, 1814

USS Fulton (1837–1861). Watercolor by Erik Heyl, 1955. (U.S. Navy Art Collection/Released)

September 11, 1814

Macdonough’s Victory on Lake Champlain. Watercolor by Edward Tufnell. (U.S. Navy Art Collection/Released)

February 16, 1804

Burning of the Philadelphia. Watercolor by Cdr. Eric C. C. Tufnell. (U.S. Navy Art Collection/Released)

October 21, 1797

USS Constitution. Watercolor and gouache painting by Michele Felice Corne, 1803. (U.S. Navy Art Collection/Released)

September 7, 1776

David Bushnell’s Turtle, First American Submarine. Drawing by Lt. Francis Barber, 1875. (U.S. Navy Art Collection/Released)

October 13, 1775

CNS Mosquito and CNS Fly. Oil on canvas by William Nowland Van Powell, 1974. (U.S. Navy Art Collection/Released)

In honor of the Navy’s 240th birthday on October 13, President Barack Obama released the following message.

The opinions expressed herein are the author’s and not necessarily those of The Maritime Executive.

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New U.S. Submarine Christened Illinois

By MarEx 2015-10-12 19:23:28

General Dynamics Electric Boat has christened the Illinois (SSN 786), the 13th submarine of the U.S. Navy’s Virginia Class.

The Saturday morning christening ceremony took place at Electric Boat’s Groton shipyard with the Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus as the ceremony’s principal speaker. First Lady Michelle Obama is the ship’s sponsor and she christened the ship by breaking a bottle of Illinois sparkling wine against the submarine’s bow before an audience of approximately 7,500 people.

USS Illinois will be delivered to the Navy in 2016.

Virginia-class submarines are among the most effective platforms in the Navy’s portfolio. In addition to anti-submarine, anti-surface ship and counter-mine warfare, Illinois will support surveillance, special operations and covert strike missions.

The Virginia class are the first U.S. Navy combatants designed for the post-Cold War era. Unobtrusive, non-provocative and connected with land, air, sea and space-based assets, Illinois and the other Virginia-class submarines are equipped to wage multi-dimensional warfare around the globe, providing the U.S. Navy with continued dominance in coastal waters or the open ocean.

The new submarine is only the second U.S. Navy ship to be commissioned with the name USS Illinois since a battleship with that name was commissioned in 1897.

With its construction partner Newport News Shipbuilding, Electric Boat has delivered 12 Virginia-class submarines; another nine are under construction.

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Cruise Ship Building Boom Thanks to China

By Wendy Laursen 2015-10-12 18:08:05

Norwegian Cruise Line has announced the introduction of the first purpose-built ship customized for the China market in 2017, part of a wider industry push for newbuildings and the Asian market.

Currently under construction at Meyer Werft, the new 4,200 guest ship Norwegian Bliss is designed specifically for the Chinese market with accommodations, cuisine and onboard experiences that cater to the unique vacation preferences of Chinese guests.

The new ship will be the second of Norwegian Cruise Line’s Breakaway Plus class and will be delivered in Spring 2017. Norwegian will take delivery of the line’s first Breakaway Plus class ship, Norwegian Escape, next week on October 22. Two additional ships in this class are on order for delivery in 2018 and 2019.

Like 2014, the last year has seen a flurry of new orders, with most of the established brands now represented in the orderbook, along with newcomers Viking Ocean and newest of all Virgin Cruises.

Following deliveries of six ships in each of 2014 and 2015, 28 ships averaging almost 29,000 lower berths per annum are now on order for delivery during the following three years, 2016-18, reports analyst GP Wild. The seven year stretch of the current orderbook is unprecedented, and it is likely that further vessels will be ordered beyond 2018.

“As well as latent demand built up during the aftermath of the global downturn and the loss of confidence post-Costa Concordia the expansion of the Chinese market is a major driver of fleet growth,” says Peter Wild of GP Wild.

China is expected to eventually become the largest cruise market in the world. From 2012 to 2014, the number of Chinese passengers grew 79 percent per year. In 2014, 697,000 passengers were from mainland China which is almost as many passengers as all other Asian markets combined (701,000).

Carnival Adds More

Earlier this year, Carnival Corporation announced the addition of two ships to its China fleet in 2016. With the two new ships, Carnival’s total capacity in China will increase by an additional 58 percent in 2016, a response to the double-digit annual returns the group is experiencing in China.

Carnival’s fleet of six China-based ships will include expanded offerings from Costa Cruises and Princess Cruises. Together, the brands will potentially offer about four million passenger cruise days in 2016.

Princess Cruises will send its Golden Princess ship to northern China, sailing out of Tianjin on a seasonal basis. Golden Princess joins the brand’s first China-based ship, Sapphire Princess, which has been homeported in Shanghai since 2014 and will start sailing year-round in China in 2016.

The brand’s two-ship deployment in 2016 will more than double its total available guest capacity in China compared to 2015 and includes its exclusive Princess Class experience designed specifically for the Chinese market.

Costa Cruises will debut Costa Fortuna in April 2016 as its fourth ship based in China. Costa Fortuna joins Costa Serena, Costa Atlantica and Costa Victoria already based in China, increasing the brand’s total available capacity in China by 43 percent in 2016.

In addition to expanding its presence in China in 2016, Carnival recently announced that the latest ship under construction for its Princess brand will be based in China year-round when introduced in summer 2017.

Carnival is also exploring potential joint ventures in China with China Merchants Group (CMG) and China State Shipbuilding Corporation (CSSC) designed to accelerate the growth of the overall cruise industry in China, including the possibility of launching a world-class Chinese domestic cruise brand, building new ships in China, and supporting port and infrastructure development.

Royal Caribbean’s Expansion

Royal Caribbean International celebrated the arrival of Quantum of the Seas in Shanghai in June. The vessel will sail on three- to eight-night, roundtrip itineraries, year-round from Shanghai to North Asia destinations.

Quantum of the Seas joined Voyager of the Seas, Mariner of the Seas and Legend of the Seas in China and together reaffirm the brand’s commitment to the Asian market.

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No Fuel Delivered to Yemen

By Reuters 2015-10-12 16:00:36

Yemen only received one percent of its monthly commercial fuel needs during September and Yemeni president Ali Abdullah Saleh asked the UN to assist the nation and allow deliveries.

Yemen relies on the import of fuel, but there has been a near-total blockade led by Saudi Arabia, which has slowed shipments to a trickle. An Arab coalition is inspecting shipments in an effort to thwart arms deliveries to Iranian-backed Houthi rebels.

The Houthis and its allies – forces loyal to former Yemen president Ali Abdullah Saleh, who was overthrown in 2011 – seized the capital city of Sanaa about a year ago.

“In a letter to the U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon on 6 October, President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi pledged to allow the import of fuel through all ports,” U.N. spokesman Farhan Haq told reporters on Monday. “Despite this pledge, no commercial fuel has yet been imported, and 11 commercial ships remain anchored off-shore.”

He said the ships were waiting to berth at Al Hudaydah port.

Fuel shortages have spread disease and suffering in arid Yemen, where access to water usually depends on fuel-powered pumps, the U.N. says. Hospitals struggle to operate without fuel and aid cannot be delivered.

The United Nations has designated Yemen as one of its highest-level humanitarian crises, alongside emergencies in South Sudan, Syria and Iraq. It says more than 21 million people in Yemen need help, or about 80 percent of the population.

“Only 1 percent of the monthly requirements for commercial fuel for Yemen were imported through Red Sea ports during September, down from a low 12 percent in August,” Haq said.

During Hadi’s speech to the annual United Nations General Assembly last month, he blamed the Houthis for the blockade and the humanitarian crisis.

Yemen relies on imports for 90 percent of its food, and Haq said commercial food prices had soared about 45 percent.

The United States told U.N. chief Ban that Saudi King Salman had pledged to allow “unfettered access” to all humanitarian aid, including fuel, during a meeting with U.S. President Barack Obama last month.

The United Nations and international rights groups are alarmed at the increasing number of civilians being killed in Yemen, at least 2,355 out of more than 4,500 dead in the past six months.

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Asian Shipping Lines Cut Fees

By Reuters 2015-10-12 12:19:14

Asian shipping lines including Japan’s Kawasaki Kisen Kaisha (“K” Line) and China Shipping Container Lines have voluntarily lowered shipping surcharges, China’s top economic planner said on Monday.

The statement by the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) comes after China’s cabinet last month said it was probing shipping firms over allegations that they have been levying arbitrary and excessive charges.

The NDRC said Korea’s Hanjin Shipping and Hyundai Merchant Marine as well as Taiwan’s Evergreen Marine, Wan Hai Lines and Yang Ming Marine Transport Corp were among the firms reducing their surcharges. Japan’s NYK had adjusted its fees on September 15, it added.

The NDRC said the companies would undertake measures such as cancelling fees for some services and lowering documentation and telex release fees.

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Tidal Energy Project Cleared off U.K.

By MarEx 2015-10-12 11:45:24

As industry and government leaders seek new forms of clean, consumable energy, tidal energy production has increasingly been viewed as a viable option. The Isle of Man is closer to harnessing the tides to generate energy as has granted Manx Tidal Energy Ltd a seven-year license to explore the potential for development off its coast. The agreement permits Manx Tidal Energy to determine the practicality and commercial viability of offshore electricity production off the Point of Ayre.

The Isle of Man is a self-governing British Crown dependency in the Irish Sea between England and Ireland. According to a Government study of the Isle of Man’s marine energy resource, the most favorable locations for tidal power generation have been identified off the north coast of the island. The region could produce up to 18 gigawatts of electricity.

The development of an offshore energy hub is one of the Isle of Man’s key strategies to boost its economy. Leasing parts of the Island’s seabed for renewable energy generation could generate more than $6 million per year and create hundreds of operational and maintenance jobs.

In addition to the area off the Point of Ayre, there is the possibility that three additional licenses will be grated off the Isle of Man’s southern coast.

If successful, turbines would be installed to the seabed in locations where there are consistently fast currents. Strong tides generate a constant supply of renewable energy, some of which could be exported to the United Kingdom.

Any development would be subject to government approval and would also require the submission of a full environmental impact assessment.

While the amount of tidal power produced thus far has been limited, there has been increased research and development recently. In August, Kepler Energy announced plans for a 30 megawatt (MW) tidal energy fence to be built in Britain’s Bristol Channel and is partnering with Oxford University’s engineering department to construct it.

The one kilometer-long fence will feature a series of marine turbines which will operate in shallower, slower waters than current designs. With an estimated cost of $220 million, Kepler expects the fence to be operational in 2021.

The world’s first tidal energy farm is located in La Rance, France and the largest facility is the Sihwa Lake Tidal Power Station in South Korea. The United States currently has no tidal plants and only a few sites where tidal energy could be produced at a reasonable price.

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Tidal Energy Project Cleared off UK

By MarEx 2015-10-12 11:45:24

As industry and government leaders seek new forms of clean, consumable energy, tidal energy production has increasingly been viewed as a viable option. The Isle of Man is closer to harnessing the tides to generate energy as has granted Manx Tidal Energy Ltd a seven-year license to explore the potential for development off its coast. The agreement permits Manx Tidal Energy to determine the practicality and commercial viability of offshore electricity production off the Point of Ayre.

The Isle of Man is a self-governing British Crown dependency in the Irish Sea between England and Ireland. According to a Government study of the Isle of Man’s marine energy resource, the most favorable locations for tidal power generation have been identified off the north coast of the island. The region could produce up to 18 gigawatts of electricity.

The development of an offshore energy hub is one of the Isle of Man’s key strategies to boost its economy. Leasing parts of the Island’s seabed for renewable energy generation could generate more than $6 million per year and create hundreds of operational and maintenance jobs.

In addition to the area off the Point of Ayre, there is the possibility that three additional licenses will be grated off the Isle of Man’s southern coast.

If successful, turbines would be installed to the seabed in locations where there are consistently fast currents. Strong tides generate a constant supply of renewable energy, some of which could be exported to the United Kingdom.

Any development would be subject to government approval and would also require the submission of a full environmental impact assessment.

While the amount of tidal power produced thus far has been limited, there has been increased research and development recently. In August, Kepler Energy announced plans for a 30 megawatt (MW) tidal energy fence to be built in Britain’s Bristol Channel and is partnering with Oxford University’s engineering department to construct it.

The one kilometer-long fence will feature a series of marine turbines which will operate in shallower, slower waters than current designs. With an estimated cost of $220 million, Kepler expects the fence to be operational in 2021.

The world’s first tidal energy farm is located in La Rance, France and the largest facility is the Sihwa Lake Tidal Power Station in South Korea. The United States currently has no tidal plants and only a few sites where tidal energy could be produced at a reasonable price.

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China Global Expansion Continues

By MarEx 2015-10-12 11:36:29

Sao Tome and Principe, an African island country located near the equator, and China signed a deal to build an $800 million deep sea port.

China’s state-owned China Harbour Engineering Co. said it will about $120 million in the project and will be responsible for engineering, design and construction of the port. The new deep sea transshipment port will be developed in phases and will be operational in 2019.

Eighty-percent of Sao Tome’s primary export commodity is cocoa, but it also has the potential for developing of hydrocarbons. Sao Tome is located in the oil-rich Gulf of Guinea, which is jointly being developed in a 60-40 split with Nigeria. And while actual production is still years off, the first licenses were sold in 2014.

Constructing a deep sea port in Sao Tome is the second indication of increased Chinese interest in Africa. Last week, reports surfaced that China is eyeing investments in Kenya’s Port of Mombasa and Lamu to expand its Maritime Silk Road vision.

The Port of Mombasa is the busiest in East Africa and serves Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda, South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Construction is currently taking place on Port of Lamu, which is part of the transportation corridor between Kenya, Ethiopia, South Sudan and Uganda. When completed, the corridor will be named LAPSET and is expected to facilitate the transport of crude and gas as well as other goods.

The project will include a network of railways, highways, pipelines, power grids for increased international including China.

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Statoil Facing Scrutiny over Spill

By MarEx 2015-10-12 11:30:55

Norway’s Petroleum Safety Authority (PSA) is investigating the oil spill reported by Statoil last week. About 250 barrels of oil was spilled during the loading of oil from Statjord A to the M/T Hilda Knutsen via the OLS loading buoy, which is located between Statfjord A and Statfjord B.

Statoil reported that the spill was caused by a leak located in a flange in the loading hose.

PSA stated: “The Petroleum Safety Authority has resolved to investigate this incident, in part to clarify the course of events and to identify the direct and underlying causes. Issues due to be covered will include the technical condition, maintenance and operation of the offshore loading system.”

In January 2014, Statoil shut down operations at its Statfjord C platform after emergency systems detected an oil leak. More than 250 crewmembers were evacuated to lifeboats.

Statfjord A is one of Statoil’s oldest producing fields, and produces more than 24,000 bpd. Centrica and ExxonMobil are Statoil’s partners in Statfjord A. Production was scheduled to end at the field a few years ago, but in 2013 Statoil, Centrica and Exxon agreed to extend production until 2020.

The entire Statfjord region is produces an average of 80,000 barrels of oil per day.

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